Steve Jobs, Silicon Valley, and “The Creation Myth”

Last week, I wrote a short Weekly Standard blog post on Steve Jobs — or, more specifically, on Silicon Valley and the role of community in fostering innovation.  I talk about Silicon Valley and tech, although the same can be said about New York and finance, Hollywood and cinema, Detroit and autos, Houston and oil, etc. […]

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Justice Stevens’s Memoir

Justice John Paul Stevens retired from the Supreme Court last year, after 34 years on the bench.  More than any other Justice except perhaps Clarence Thomas, he deserves a biography, if not outright cinematic treatment.  He has lived a fascinating life. He was born in 1920 to a wealthy Chicago family.  Attending the ’32 World […]

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Michele Bachmann Is Open To Suggestions

At this weekend’s South Carolina debate, as in the previous Iowa debate, Michele Bachmann said that the Constitution prohibits States from imposing Obamacare-style individual health insurance mandates. But, she admitted this time, she didn’t know what part of the Constitution does this. So I wrote about it for the Standard‘s blog, my latest post on the Tea […]

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The Tea Party, Progressives, and the Constitution

A couple weeks ago, The Weekly Standard published my essay on a split among Tea Party members on fundamental constitutional questions.  As I tried to explain there, the Tea Party combines two very different views of the U.S. Constitution: One contingent of the party is focused on liberty against both federal and state regulation, and see […]

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Department of Corrections

One friend has pointed out — with merciful tact — that my Alito article includes one unfortunate misstatement of Bickel’s record.  Describing Bickel’s 1972 essay in Commentary, which was later adapted for republication in The Morality of Consent, I said: … Bickel criticized the Supreme Court’s eager grant of broad constitutional protections to the 1971 […]

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George Will on Bickel

OK, just one more “last” footnote to the Alito article: In describing Yale’s Alexander Bickel, I quoted George Will, who in 1974 called Bickel “the keenest public philosopher of our time.” Those looking for the full context of Will’s remark can find it in Will’s 1978 collection, The Pursuit of Happiness, and Other Sobering Thoughts. […]

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One Last Alito Footnote

While I’ll clearing out my “Alito Trivia” file, let me add one more anecdote that did not make it into my article, but which may be of some historical amusement. Last fall — just one week after hearing argument in Snyder v. Phelps, actually – Justice Alito delivered the Manhattan Institute’s annual “Wriston Lecture.”  The subject: […]

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For More on Alexander Bickel …

If you read this week’s Alito essay and would like to learn more about the Yale law professor who attracted Samuel Alito to Yale, then you have a few options. Of course there are his major books: The Least Dangerous Branch: The Supreme Court at the Bar of American Politics (1963) Politics and the Warren […]

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Justice Alito, “The Burkean Justice”

The Weekly Standard‘s new cover story is my latest essay: “The Burkean Justice,” a review of Justice Alito’s separate opinions in three recent First Amendment cases. In my essay, I argue that these three opinions reflect the influence of Alexander Bickel, the late Yale professor whose writings attracted young Alito to study at the Yale […]

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Welcome

After insisting that I wouldn’t start a blog, I’ve basically decided to start a blog.  Primarily, this page will serve as the place for updates on my outside writing activities.  Anytime I publish something at another publication, such as the Weekly Standard, I’ll post a brief note on it here. But I will also use […]

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